RESPECT. Interview: Artist Anderson Brasileiro Explains His Favorite Element Of Art, One Tool He Can’t Live Without, Graffiti & More

Image Credit: dvrkroom

Anderson Brasilerio is a young artist from Manhattan, NYC and with the power of social media (@whoisghost91) we came across his work on Instagram and was instantly intrigued by his amazing portfolio of artwork. We got a chance to chop it up with Anderson to speak about his life behind the scenes and where he got the idea to start doing art. He told us about some of his favorite art influences growing up, owning over 65 paintings, the most important art tool in his studio and where he see’s himself in the next 5 years.
As a lover of Art this interview will give you a great insight on what it takes to become an artist and will give you an idea of how other artist find ways to express themselves with the paintbrush.
Get into the interview below.
RESPECT.:Tell everyone who you are.
Anderson Brasilerio: My name is Anderson Brasileiro, friends and fellow artists know me as “Ghost” though; name I used back in my graffiti days.
Where are you from?
I was born in Manhattan, New York June 5th 1991. Parents raised me in Astoria, Queens till I was around 5.
Moved around a lot after that (Texas, Connecticut), ended up in Durham, North Carolina for about 7 years. I reside
in Charlotte, North Carolina now for about 10 years.
When did you start doing Art?
I’ve always been into drawing and painting, since my cartoon and cereal days. My pops used to watch and paint
along to those Bob Ross shows a lot when I was like 3 years old. But I got into tagging when I was 13. I was handed
a spray can and I started throwing my name all over Durham’s streets. My canvas work began in 2012 when I got a
hold of a large canvas, realized it was easier to get better work done painting legally so I stuck with it.

Image Credit: dvrkroom

What inspired you to do Art?
Well it was always a hobbie since I was a kid, but the graffiti definitely came from seeing the subways and city walls
of New York covered in tags and murals. I felt totally connected to the public expression, the danger, and the penmanship of those street artists. An old head I used to know gave me my name “Ghost”, and I proceeded to tag it everywhere. In 2012, I was watching one of my favorite documentaries “Style Wars” and there was a part that stuck out to me, where the graffiti artists had an art show where they exhibited their work on canvas and other objects. The idea hit me immediately to start putting my work on stretched canvas. I’ve been on that wave for the past 6 years.
Growing up what artist influenced you to start painting?
I’m a huge fan of Picasso, Matisse, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. I have many other favorites but those three definitely have the strongest hold on my influence for sure. They made painting seem cool to me. The old clips of Picasso morphing his paintings into different figures and objects mesmerized me. I started realizing that painting abstractly made more sense to me. I learned the importance of the use of color due to Matisse. And being the urban grafitti-loving street kid that I am, the work of Basquiat hit me like an astroid.

Image Credit: dvrkroom

How many paintings do you own?
I have over 65 paintings in my possession right now. My room is covered, I had to get rid of my bed. I sleep on a tiny floor mattress now.
What is your creative mindset before or doing paintings?
I usually open my mind up to source material. I might watch a movie, open some magazines, flip through some poetry, skim through some art books, listen through an entire album. Then I’ll pack up my supplies and easel, go outside behind my apartment building by the woods, post up and just catch vibes. The wind and sun, looking at the sky, it charges me up; getting nature involved is important to me, I’m sure Van Gogh thought the same. Also takes me back to my youthful graffiti days.
What is your most important tool, something you cant live without in your studio?
Definitely my paint brush(es). I’ve come to need a paint brush more than a spray can nowadays. Other than that
its gotta be my stereo/headphones. Music is vital.
The element of art you enjoy working with most.
I’m very fixed on the color element of art. The energy and vibrations of colors (contrasting and complementary) are the first thing I notice in any work of art.
Where do you see yourself in Art 5 years from now?
I honestly never know how to answer that question, but I do know that I’ll be hitting the 10 year mark of my career
around that time. They say it takes 10 years/10,000 hours to master a craft, so I aim to accomplish that. And hopefully help move the culture here in Charlotte further with the help of my art.
What does painting mean to you?
It’s become as important as food to me. I need it to survive practically. If I ever go a week without painting, I start
to feel anxious and stressed. My thoughts become unclear and I usually end up making bad decisions. Every time I pick up my brush/spray I open the flood gates of my conscious and subconscious mind. I become sane again.
In your opinion, what role does art play in our society today?
I think art is becoming very controversial as of right now. We live in a very unstable time so artists feel the
need to create powerful/sensitive work to depict the moment. I mean, Banksy’s work says it all. Art has become a
megaphone, the artist projecting their opinions to the masses to entice the view to feel some kind of way. It’s
important as an artist to be very responsible with the way they handle subjects. I don’t ever get political,
my choice in subject is usually just mindlessness. I try to not think too much, but rather lose myself in the nature
of my subconscious while utilizing color and shape.
What prices do your Artwork range from?
I paint big pieces so nothing is lower than $300 nowadays. I’ve done a few murals here in Charlotte ranging in the
thousands.
Last words to end this interview.
Support the local artists in your community! The progression of culture not only relies on the artist but also in
the support of the community. Lots of people give up too early in their career because of the lack of support around them. But on that note, shout out to all the struggling artists out there that wont let the doubts and hardships
be the reason they abandon their dreams. Keep the passion alive, and keep creating.
Check out more of his work on Instagram here!